Date: 27th February 2015 at 8:41am
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Fernando Alonso was released from hospital earlier this week following his crash during the second winter test session in Barcelona.

The former two-time Formula One World Champion crashed his McLaren Honda on the final day of testing with McLaren sighting a freak gust of wind as the reason behind the incident.

Fellow Spaniard Carlos Sainz also struggled in his Toro Rosso during the same time and an eye witness account also suggested that this was the cause of the crash.

Alonso remained in hospital for several days after he was sent via helicopter from the tracks medical centre.

The 33-year-old suffered a side impact crash measuring 30G’s (g-force), but as there was no footage of the incident it is not known if his head suffered any impact in the crash or whether he suffered ‘whiplash-like’ trauma.

Hospital CT scans and MRI scans all came back positive, however Alonso is sitting out the final test session in Barcelona and has been replaced by Kevin Magnussen.

?He was unconscious for a relatively short period of time, We could hear him breathing but no other sounds.? McLaren chairman Ron Dennis told Sky Sports.

‘The CTU and MRI scans were completely clear, no indication of any damage. There was no concussion detected in the scan and physically he is perfect,?

‘Head injuries have taken centre stage in the world and people are being super careful. We were absolutely supportive that Fernando was perfect before he was released [from hospital],?


Shortly after the incident rumours speculated that Alonso’s crash was actually caused by Alonso suffering an electric shock following a technical problem with the cars hybrid system.

Whilst Formula One’s governing body the FIA will conduct their own comprehensive investigation into the accident, McLaren have firmly denied that a technical problem was behind the crash.

Dennis added: ‘There was categorically no electrocution and we have complete conviction that the data doesn?t show any car failure. There was nothing broken and nothing out of the ordinary that we can see.’