Date: 27th December 2012 at 10:36am
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Ferrari president Luca di Montezemolo has heated up his power struggle with Formula One supremo Bernie Ecclestone.

The pair are two of the most powerful men in motorsport and they have exchanged a few heated words ever since the climax of the 2012 Formula One World Championship.

The majority of it of course is just pantomime, which is apt for the time of year, but in a recent interview the boss of Ferrari not only states that he believes the time for Bernie to take a backward step has come and has criticised the direction Formula One has taken.

‘We need people with a more modern view, It is the same in my company. In a couple of years I will no longer be the person for Ferrari. Someone else will come.’ di Montezemolo told the Independent newspaper according to Autosport Magazine.

‘What I always say to Bernie is that the one-man show in life is finished. You need a team around you. We have to ask these questions in a positive way and look ahead. Sooner or later it will happen to Bernie as to me.’

One of the changes in modern day Formula One is the move away from the traditional European circuits that have become so familiar with the sport over the decades and a move away to Asia and America.

In the past few weeks it’s been rumoured a move to Thailand could be on the cards and many believe that the move to different countries and continents is the right thing for modern day F1.

The reason behind this move is obviously the force behind growing the market for both F1 teams in terms of engine manufacturers and sponsors.

F1 is a global brand and under Bernie Ecclestone, Formula One has recently visited more and more of these destinations.

While some will argue that this is the right strategy for Formula One, as Ferrari president Luca di Montezemolo’s opinion holds a lot of clout and he doesn’t appear to be sure it’s the right move for the sport.

di Montezemolo doesn’t want to see empty grandstands as a sport develops in a new country, he wants the atmosphere and passionate crowd brings and uses the Le Mans 24 hour race as an example.

‘Three years ago, I was so impressed when I was invited to open Le Mans, It was a party. You go to the pits in some circuits in F1 and it’s like a desert.

‘Do you think it good that we race in the middle of nowhere? Without the public, without the fans, the flags, the passion, it is cold. I don’t like it.


 

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