Date: 23rd June 2011 at 9:20am
Written by:

Behind the scenes in the Formula One paddock, the politics as ever have rumbled on and on for months.

One of the subjects under heavy discussion was Formula One?s new engine plans which were set to be introduced in 2013.

As part of FIA president Jean Todt’s plans for Formula One to be more environmentally friendly Formula One was set to switch from the current 2.4-litre V8s to more efficient 1.6-litre, four-cylinder turbo units.

The current proposal as ever didn?t have the full backing of the teams with Ferrari and Mercedes-Benz strongly against the original proposal, while Renault threatened to leave the sport if the proposals didn?t go ahead.

‘If I talk to Renault, they say that if we don’t introduce this engine for 2013 they will leave F1; if I talk to Mercedes and Ferrari, they ask me to delay the introduction for a few years. They aren’t against the rules, they just wanted them postponed.? Todt told the press two weeks ago.

A compromise had to happen and that is what has happened (common sense in F1? Is it not April 1st).

Mercedes main area of complaint was the speed of the changes. As redevelopment and design of engines is obviously expensive, so to appease the German manufacturer the change will now take place a year later.

Ferrari?s complaint was over the plan for four-cylinder turbo units; this has now been changed to six-cylinder engines, which was a compromise for Renault, so more emphasis will now be placed on hybrid energy-efficient technologies, such as KERS with Power of energy-recovery systems set to double, all with the aim of improving efficiency of F1 engines by 35%.

The alterations to the plan will be formally agreed on Monday via a fax vote of the FIA’s World Motor Sport Council.