Date: 12th September 2014 at 9:29am
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Formula One is not opposed to changed the rules during a season.

In 2014 we’ve already had a ban on FRIC [Front-and-Rear Interconnected Suspension systems] and now we have a ban on some team to driver radio messages.

With the addition of driver radio being plugged into the world feed for all television audiences to hear, there has been an ongoing grumble and debate over the use of radio.

The team radio is used for everything, from giving information about the gap to another driver, when to make a pit-stop, team orders, right through to detailed telemetry information regarding how another driver is faster in a particular sector of a lap.

And whilst some will argue that Formula One is a team sport and so the technology within the team should be transferred to the driver, others argue that they do not want to see the supposed elite drivers in the world have their hand held around the lap.

The telemetry information has enabled a drivers race engineer to tell them what settings to change in the car, when to brake, when to accelerate, what line to take in a corner, all the things that the traditionalist racers would argue should come naturally to a racing driver.

So a ban has been put in place, or at least a racing directive thanks to article 20.1 which states ?the driver must drive the car alone and unaided’.

?In order to ensure that the requirements of Article 20.1 of the F1 Sporting Regulations is respected at all times we intend to rigorously enforce this regulation with immediate effect,? FIA Race Director Charlie Whiting was quoted by Sky Sports.

?Therefore no radio conversation from pit to driver may include any information that is related to the performance of the car or driver.?

?We should also remind you that data transmission from pit to car is specifically prohibited by Article 8.5.2 of the F1 Technical Regulations.?


Information on pit-stop strategies or safety will not be affected, but other areas appear to be in a grey area.

What happens to important information such as altering engine modes to reduce fuel consumption?

Drivers often ramp up their fuel mode in certain parts of the race to enable them to race for track position and then save fuel in less competitive sections of the Grand Prix. How will the driver know when to do this?

Or a change to the brake balance? The latter could be a safety switch or a performance switch for the car, but who is to know other than the team and under what point does a performance switch to prevent a safety concern become viable?