Date: 12th February 2014 at 9:29am
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1996 Formula One World Champion Damon Hill has backed F1 plans for double points at the final race of the season.

Ecclestone and the FIA announced the idea of double points for the final race of the Formula One season towards the end of last year and the plan will be adopted in the forthcoming season as it has been approved by the Formula One strategy group.

This all means that the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, a track with no history or soul is, points wise, twice as important as winning the likes of the iconic races such as Monaco or the British Grand Prix.

In fact with 24 points available for finishing fourth, that would be worth just one single point less than a race win during any other race weekend of the season. With second place taking 36 points and third taking 30.

The proposal was met with anger from those in and around the sport, most fans and those in the media branded the gimmick as too artificial, whilst quadruple Formula One World Champion Sebastian Vettel said that idea was absurd and believed that drivers, fans and experts were ‘horrified’.

Since mid-December on VitalF1.com we have been running the front page poll: Double points for the final race of 2014?

92% of our readers branded the plan as stupid, 6% didn’t care and 2% thought it was a positive step.

In the media, very few have spoken about the idea in a positive light, but Sky Sports pundit Damon Hill has backed the plans.

‘If you go to Wimbledon and you are in a knock-out competition it then gets more crucial and more important the closer you get to the final – and the final is worth a lot more points than the first round,’ Hill told Sky Sports.

‘Personally, I don’t see what the story is about. Winning the World Championship is the goal and if it gets more and more intense towards the end, and there is more at stake at the end of the championship, then that should be more exciting.’

Formula One supremo Bernie Ecclestone however would like to see the double points plan extended to three races as it would extend the interest in the Formula One drivers and constructors championships for longer. However his plan has failed to receive much support.