Date: 2nd November 2011 at 10:22am
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Renault [or Lotus as they are likely to be known in 2012] are still awaiting news on the possible return of Robert Kubica.

The 26-year-old crashed a Skoda Fabia during the opening stage of the Ronde di Andora rally in Italy back in February.

His car crashed into a barrier which penetrated his car leaving him with a partially severed right hand and fractures to his right leg and arm.

In the days following his accident, the Pole underwent three operations and was put in an induced coma to help aid his recovery, it had been hoped that he wouldn?t require any further surgery, but in early March, Kubica had a fourth operation to help the mobility of his elbow.

After a month of rehabilitation the Renault driver underwent another large operation which was to remove adhesions affecting the functionality of his right forearm and elbow muscles and in August he underwent further elbow surgery in a bid to give him full mobility of his right elbow.

Surgeons were reportedly very happy immediately following the procedure and after a few days rest in hospital, Kubica resumed his rehabilitation and training programme.

Since that time Kubica’s management team have remained confident he will race in Formula One again, but as yet not official word regarding a return in 2012 has been made.

‘We have to assess options and we are still waiting for Robert to come back to us to say he can test, the last information I have is that we will have to sit down and discuss how we can handle his comeback, because I don’t believe he can commit in the coming days. In the coming weeks maybe ? but not coming days. team boss Eric Boullier told Autosport Magazine.

‘So we have to make sure that we work together on a plan for him to come back. But I still need to have a proper plan to make sure that, which I don’t wish, if he is not coming back how we go forward in a good way.’

Eric Boullier had previously given a November deadline to Kubica over a decision regarding his immediate future for next season, as the team will need enough time to find a replacement driver if necessary and the team boss remains anxious about making a final decision.

He concluded: ‘Nobody has a medical report and nobody has seen him driving a car and being at speed. Until we see him and have the confirmation then, we can not say anything. And we need to keep, unfortunately, the option of not having him back.